WAF DEVOPS/SECOPS

WAF DEVOPS/SECOPS

 

 

WAF Rules

  • Honeypot (A): This component creates a honeypot to lure and deflect content scrapers and bad bots. A discrete API Gateway endpoint (embedded in the web application) triggers a custom AWS Lambda function, which intercepts  the suspicious request and adds the source IP address to the AWS WAF block list.
  • SQL injection (B) and cross-site scripting (C) protection: The solution automatically configures two native AWS WAF rules that protect against common SQL injection or cross-site scripting (XSS) patterns in the URI, query string, or body of a request.
  • Log parsing (D): A custom AWS Lambda function automatically parses access logs to identify suspicious behavior and add the corresponding source IP addresses to an AWS WAF block list.
  • Manual IP lists (E): This component creates two specific AWS WAF rules that allow you to manually insert IP addresses that you want to block (blacklist) or allow (whitelist).
  • IP-list parsing (F): A custom AWS Lambda function automatically checks third-party IP reputation lists hourly for malicious IP addresses to add to an AWS WAF block list.
  • HTTP flood protection (G): This component configures a rate-based rule that automatically blocks web requests from a client once they exceed a configurable threshold.

 

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DEVOPS / Agile Technical Titles and Skills

DEVOPS / Agile Technical Titles and Skills

 

  • UI Designer
  • Full Stack Developer
  • DevOps Engineers (Puppet, Chef, Ansible, Salt, Docker, Kubernetes, AWS, Azure, Golang)
  • SecOps
  • Cloud Solution Engineers (AWS, Azure, Rackspace, Google Cloud Platform)
  • SysOps and TechOps Engineers (Jenkins, Hudson, GIT, Bamboo, Stash)
  • Linux Systems Engineers (AWS, KVM, VMWare, Nagios, Python, Shell, Ruby)
  • Linux Systems Administrators (Linux, Unix, Oracle, Solaris, Ubuntu, Debian, CentOS, RedHat

Big Data Examples

Big Data Examples

 

Those taste limitations extend beyond food, too. Consider House of Cards, the political thriller now its second season on Netflix. In creating it, Netflix was informed by existing viewer data: It knew that lots of its customers enjoyed Kevin Spacey, who plays the lead role, and a good proportion of those viewers were also fans of director David Fincher. Throw in another preference—one for political dramas—and the company knew it was the perfect show to bet on.

DevOps / Continuous Innovation and Delivery

DevOps / Continuous Innovation and Delivery

Continuous delivery is the ability the ship new and enhanced features, updates, and patches to your customers and your environment more frequently, with higher quality, and substantially less risk. This allows organisations to learn their market faster and adapt accordingly.

Spurred by the hypercompetitive global business market and tough economic climate, many enterprises are rethinking their traditional business processes. Whether their goals are to increase productivity, improve quality, hasten time to market, reduce costs, or enhance customer satisfaction, it’s increasingly likely that the cloud will play some role in the solutions they adopt.

According to Frost & Sullivan, the number of businesses using cloud services will more than double in the next two years.1They are driven by business-impacting objectives, including the need to reduce costs (cited by 55 percent of businesses), improve application availability (38 percent), and scale their applications (35 percent). At the same time, savvy enterprises are discovering that the cloud holds the power to transform IT processes and support business growth objectives. In this context, a robust Platform as a Service (PaaS) is more than a toolset for developers; and Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) can be more than a place to host apps. Instead, IT departments can use the cloud to redefine the continuum of development and operations—a process that is becoming known as DevOps

Spurred by the hyper competitive global business market and tough economic climate, many enterprises are rethinking their traditional business processes. Whether their goals are to increase productivity, improve quality, hasten time to market, reduce costs, or enhance customer satisfaction, it’s increasingly likely that the cloud will play some role in
the solutions they adopt.

According to Frost & Sullivan, the number of businesses using cloud services will more than double in the next two years.1

They are driven by business-impacting objectives, including the need to reduce costs (cited by 55 percent of businesses), improve application availability (38 percent), and scale their applications (35 percent).

At the same time, savvy enterprises are discovering that the cloud holds the power to transform IT processes and support business growth objectives. In this context, a robust
Platform as a Service (PaaS) is more than a toolset for developers; and Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) can be more than a place to host apps. Instead, IT departments can use the cloud to redefine the continuum of development and operations—a process that is becoming known as DevOps

  • Improve internal client satisfaction – Line of business managers have little understanding of (or patience with) the complex processes required to deploy
  • Improve user satisfaction – For businesses that employ best practices in measuring end-user satisfaction, ratings can be expected to increase following deployment of DevOps processes. End users (whether customers, employees, or partners) will likely experience fewer bugs and performance glitches when new applications or features are rolled out. Furthermore, enterprises may be encouraged to use the streamlined platform to update their software more often, adding more sophisticated capabilities.
  • Manage the budget – In many companies, IT projects are notorious for going over budget. With a DevOps platform, Operations managers can be confident that their cost estimates will remain on track, with fewer unexpected surprises.
  • Manage the budget – In many companies, IT projects are notorious for going over budget. With a DevOps platform, Operations managers can be confident that their cost estimates will remain on track, with fewer unexpected surprises.

A business can’t be innovative if developers are mired in mundane coding tasks. A business can’t be nimble if it takes weeks to deploy new applications, and if those applications freeze if usage exceeds expectations. To meet the needs in a competitive business environment, enterprises have to be willing to trade in old, cumbersome development and deployment processes for a DevOps approach. In DevOps, developers utilize cloud-based platform tools and patterns to build operational instructions right into their software applications. The result is fewer errors, faster deployment times, and lower costs than traditional development/deployment processes

Continuous Delivery is not just automation – but understanding what to automate and what not to automate. Its not just provisioning, but also scaling up and down. Its not only break-fix but removing risk as quick as possible.

Delivery lifecycle – beyond just writing code. The real lifecycle – when it is being used, and has to be patched…and updated.

  • Build
  • Test
  • Deploy
  • Configure
  • Manage
  • Update
  • Scale (up and down)

Boiler Templates

  • Runtimes
    • Liberty for Java
    • Node.js
    • Ruby
  • Web and Application Services
    • Data Cache
    • Session Cache
    • Elastic MQ
    • Decision
    • SSO
    • Log Analysis
    • Redis
    • RabbitMQ
  • Mobile Services
    • Push
    • Cloud Code
    • Mobile Application Management
    • Mobile Quality Assurance
    • Mobile Data
    • Twillio
  • Data Management Services
    • SQL Databases
    • JSON Databases
    • MongoDB
    • MySQL
    • PostgreSQL
  • Big Data
    • Blue Acceleration
    • Map Reduce
  • DevOps
    • Monitoring and Analytics
    • Mobile Quality Assurance
    • Git Hosting
    • Deployment Automation
    • Web IDE
    • Agile Development

eCoSystem Toolbox

Agile Culture

Learn DevOps

CMS

  • Joomla
  • Magneto