Sales Leadership – Glengarry Glen Ross Alec Baldwin

Sales Leadership – Glengarry Glen Ross Alec Baldwin

 

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Observations of a Winning Culture by Andrew Banks

Observations of a Winning Culture by Andrew Banks

  1. Tolerance for failure, BUT, no tolerance for incompetence.
  2. Huge willingness to experiment, BUT, highly disciplined.
  3. Physiological Safe, BUT, very candid, people give people honest feedback.
  4. Collaboration for everything, BUT, individual accountability.
  5. Flat structure and strong decisive leadership.https://dms.licdn.com/playback/C5605AQHJePEdNnd1og/30b2b340264849e4803b69cebc17b287/feedshare-mp4_3300-overlay/1507940147251-drlcss?e=1554771600&v=beta&t=t0_q7ezLp_gU_NdxDCuw2mPGmOhioMA172Sj7OXbCas

Everyone in sales needs watch these videos;

Everyone in sales needs watch these videos;

A Conference Call – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kNz82r5nyUw

Meeting Backup – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wU99CCWr77k

The Expert – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BKorP55Aqvg

Email in Real Life – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HTgYHHKs0Zw

A Video Conference in Real Life – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JMOOG7rWTPg

Stuff Business People Say – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MHg_M_zKA6Y

Working from Home – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=co_DNpTMKXk

What buyers want from Trusted Advisor. (that is not you sales person, its the presales guy)

What buyers want from Trusted Advisor. (that is not you sales person, its the presales guy)

  1. Educate me with new ideas or perspectives
  2. Collaborated with me
  3. Persuaded me we would achieve results
  4. Listened to me
  5. Understood my needs
  6. Helped me avoid potential pitfalls
  7. Crafted a compelling solution
  8. Depicted purchasing process accurately
  9. Connected with me personlly
  10. Overall value from the company is superior to other options

Aristotle triptych

Aristotle triptych

Tell them what you are going to say, say it and then tell them what you said.

 

  1. Tell them what you will tell them. This is your opener in which you lay out why you are speaking to the audience. Your message should be predicated on two things: what you want to say, and what the audience needs to hear. Too many presenters focus on the first half but not the second. Knowing what your audience needs to hear is critical to the leadership aspect of your message. You are there to provide direction.
  2. Tell them. This section is open ended. It is the time when you pour out all your content, and explain the details. As a leader, it is the best time for you to build your business case. Your message should ring with logic; that is, you need to emphasize the benefits of your points. But important messages also need to resonate with the heart. Put people in the position to feel why what you’re saying is important and how things will be better when they follow through with your ideas.
  3. Tell them what you just told them. Reiterate your salient points. For leaders, this is the opportunity to give people a reason to believe in your idea and in you. And then demonstrate how you and your team are the ones to deliver on the message. That is, if you are a sales person, how you will back up the product. Or if you are a CEO, how you will guide the company through troubled waters.

This is a formula but it need not be formulaic. That is you can imbue the structure with data but more importantly with your personality. Laden it with stories that amplify your points. Season it with numbers, add spice, sprinkle in humor. And relate the message to your audience.

Not only does Aristotle’s triptych work for formal presentation,

Sales Tips from HBR.org 6 Reasons Salespeople Win or Lose a Sale Article

Sales Tips from HBR.org 6 Reasons Salespeople Win or Lose a Sale Article

catapult-sales

 

  1. Listen and understand and then matches solution to solve specific problem.
  2. Earn trust by making them feel comfortable and understand long-term needs.
  3. Challenges perceptions and teach new ways to solve the problem.
  4. Identify the person who will dominate the entire selection committee.
  5. Buyers aren’t necessarily fixated on the market leader and are more than willing to select second-tier competitors than one might expect.
  6. Understand your buyers preferences and previous experience and competitive landscape
    • 63% said they would select a fairly well-known brand with 85% of the functionality at 80% of the cost.
    • 33% prefer the most prestigious, best-known brand with the highest functionality and cost.
    • 5% would select a relatively unknown brand with 75% of the functionality at 60% of the cost of the best-known brand.
  7. The importance of price falls into three categories.
    1. Price conscious – product price is a top decision-making factor.
      • Example: Manufacturing, health care, real estate and fashion.
    2. Price sensitive – product price is secondary to other decision-making factors such as functionality and vendor capability.
      • Example: Banking, Technology, Consulting
    3. Price immune – price becomes an issue only when the solution they want is priced far more than the others being considered.
      • Example: Government
  8. Understanding the buyer approval processes, bureaucracy and project approval process.
  9. Match style to buyer preference:
    • Professional salesperson who knows their product inside and out but is not necessarily someone you would consider befriending
    • Friendly salesperson who is likable and proficient in explaining their product
    • Charismatic salesperson who you truly enjoyed being with but is not the most knowledgeable about their product [NB: This isn’t a option, just a by product of the industry]