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AWS Artefacts

 

WS Artifact provides on-demand access to AWS’ security and compliance reports and select online agreements. Reports available in AWS Artifact include our Service Organization Control (SOC) reports, Payment Card Industry (PCI) reports, and certifications from accreditation bodies across geographies and compliance verticals that validate the implementation and operating effectiveness of AWS security controls. Agreements available in AWS Artifact include the Business Associate Addendum (BAA) and the Nondisclosure Agreement (NDA).

 

Aristotle triptych

Aristotle triptych

Tell them what you are going to say, say it and then tell them what you said.

 

  1. Tell them what you will tell them. This is your opener in which you lay out why you are speaking to the audience. Your message should be predicated on two things: what you want to say, and what the audience needs to hear. Too many presenters focus on the first half but not the second. Knowing what your audience needs to hear is critical to the leadership aspect of your message. You are there to provide direction.
  2. Tell them. This section is open ended. It is the time when you pour out all your content, and explain the details. As a leader, it is the best time for you to build your business case. Your message should ring with logic; that is, you need to emphasize the benefits of your points. But important messages also need to resonate with the heart. Put people in the position to feel why what you’re saying is important and how things will be better when they follow through with your ideas.
  3. Tell them what you just told them. Reiterate your salient points. For leaders, this is the opportunity to give people a reason to believe in your idea and in you. And then demonstrate how you and your team are the ones to deliver on the message. That is, if you are a sales person, how you will back up the product. Or if you are a CEO, how you will guide the company through troubled waters.

This is a formula but it need not be formulaic. That is you can imbue the structure with data but more importantly with your personality. Laden it with stories that amplify your points. Season it with numbers, add spice, sprinkle in humor. And relate the message to your audience.

Not only does Aristotle’s triptych work for formal presentation,

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Learning Python Week 6

The second half of this course includes some important content for improving your Python programming. In particular, Class6 on Functions and Namespaces, Class8 on Modules, and Class9 on Classes and Objects.

In this email of Learning Python we are going to cover the following:

I. Introduction Week6
video http://youtu.be/sjYBE6EWwuc
Length is 3 minutes

II. Functions, Part1
video http://youtu.be/i1MzASLYOZY
Length is 12 minutes

III. Namespaces
video http://youtu.be/r8U3_KkvKtw
Length is 10 minutes

IV. Functions, Part2
video http://youtu.be/pRaVagkh9l8
Length is 12 minutes

Additional content that you may be interested in

There is a good chapter on functions in “Learn Python the Hard Way” (I would stop after you finish, “What You Should See”).
http://learnpythonthehardway.org/book/ex18.html

Darren O’Connor has a blog on “Defined Functions – Python”.
http://mellowd.co.uk/ccie/?p=5118

 

Exercises

Reference code for these exercises is posted on GitHub at:
https://github.com/ktbyers/pynet/tree/master/learnpy_ecourse/class6

1. Create a function that returns the multiplication product of three parameters–x, y, and z. z should have a default value of 1.
a. Call the function with all positional arguments.
b. Call the function with all named arguments.
c. Call the function with a mix of positional and named arguments.
d. Call the function with only two arguments and use the default value for z.
2. Write a function that converts a list to a dictionary where the index of the list is used as the key to the new dictionary (the function should return the new dictionary).

3a.Convert the IP address validation code (Class4, exercise1) into a function, take one variable ‘ip_address’ and return either True or False (depending on whether ‘ip_address’ is a valid IP). Only include IP address checking in the function–no prompting for input, no printing to standard output.

3b. Import this IP address validation function into the Python interpreter shell and test it (use both ‘import x’ and ‘from x import y’).

4. Create a function using your dotted decimal to binary conversion code from Class3, exercise1. In the function–do not prompt for input and do not print to standard output. The function should take one variable ‘ip_address’ and should return the IP address in dotted binary format always padded to eight binary digits (for example 00001010.01011000.00010001.00010111). You might want to create other functions as well (for example, the zero-padding to eight binary digits).

5. Write a program that prompts a user for an IP address, then checks if the IP address is valid, and then converts the IP address to binary (dotted decimal format). Re-use the functions created in exercises 3 and 4 (‘import’ the functions into your new program).

 

 

Class Outline

I. Introduction
A. Why write functions?

II. Functions Part1
A. Function with no parameters
1. Syntax and structure
2. Calling the function
3. Return value
4. Using the return value
5. Docstrings

B. Function with parameters
1. Syntax
2. Default values

C. Various ways of passing arguments to functions
1. Positional arguments
2. Named arguments
3. Mixing positional and named arguments

III. Python Namespaces
A. Functions create their own namespace
B. Name resolution order

IV. Functions Part2
A. Using lists and dicts as function arguments
B. Importing a function

 

 

Video Archive

Week1
Introduction and Some Questions
What is the Nature of Python
Interpreter Shell, Variables, and Assignment
Strings

Week2
Introduction
Print and raw_input
Numbers
Lists and Tuples
Booleans

Week3
Introduction
If Conditionals
For Loops
Passing Arguments into a Script

Week4
Introduction
While Loops
Dictionaries
Exceptions

Week5
Class Review (weeks 1 – 4)